Sunday, November 27, 2011

maple-glazed
pumpkin-pecan scones

Got pumpkin? Make scones.
If you're frugal like me, you stocked up on canned pumpkin while it was on sale for the Thanksgiving holiday. Dive right into your canned pumpkin stash by baking these semi-healthy, maple-laced scones [Anything with pumpkin can be labeled "semi-healthy" because of its massive vitamin A content]. They hit the spot for breakfast, slathered with Earth Balance or jam [or better yet, pumpkin or apple butter], but I think they're just fine on their own – the perfect accessory for your cappucino and Sunday Times. They also freeze beautifully.

MAPLE-GLAZED, PUMPKIN-PECAN SCONES
Scones

  • 3 cups flour
  • 2 heaping T soy flour
  • 1 cup canned, unsweetened pumpkin [about 1/2 a can; you can freeze the rest in a ziplock bag]
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/4 tsp cloves
  • 1 T baking powder
  • 1/2 cup pecans, chopped
  • 4 T Earth Balance
  • 1/2 cup non-dairy milk
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1 tsp maple extract
  • 1 tsp apple cider vinegar

Maple Glaze

  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp maple extract
  • 2 T soy cream or non-dairy milk


Makes 16 scones

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Grease a cookie sheet or line with a silpat or parchment.
  2. Mix dry ingredients, including chopped nuts, in a large bowl. Cut in the Earth Balance, and using your fingers [my preferred method] or a pastry cutter, work in the EB until it's well integrated. The mixture should feel like sand.
  3. Mix wet ingredients in a medium bowl. Stir the wet into the dry until just mixed. Now's not the time to be a perfectionist. The dough will be slightly sticky; this is normal. Divide the dough in two and form into two rounds, about 7-8 inches in diameter, on the cookie sheet. Gently each round into 8 slices.
  4. Bake for 18-22 minutes, or until a knife comes inserted in the thickest part of the scone comes out clean.
  5. While the scones are baking, whisk together the glaze ingredients. When scones are completely cook, either spread or drizzle on the glaze.



7 comments:

maryeb said...

These look wonderful. Can they be frozen with the glaze on them or should I wait, and glaze them after they've been thawed and I'm ready to serve them?
Thanks for providing an easy recipe to add to my holiday baking repertoire.

foodfeud said...

I want to already be making these.

selina said...

I love scones and those look really good.

urban vegan said...

@Maryeb: I froze mine already glazed.

Hannah said...

Forget about using up leftovers, these sound like they'd be worth busting open a fresh can of pumpkin for! ...And maybe even doubling to prevent that little leftover issue. :)

Mia said...

What is the purpose of the soy flour? Are there any substitutions? I'm not sure I can find it bulk and don't want to buy a whole bag.

urban vegan said...

Mia: Soy flour is an egg sub. You can probably make without and they should be fine. (Or use another egg replacer, if you like)