Friday, January 28, 2011

gentrified coleslaw, candied squash nuts, and blossom NYC

Flavor-forward coleslaw, at last

Gentrification. It’s happening everywhere: things that fell out of favor are suddenly resurrected, rediscovered, and reinvented. It was bound to happen to coleslaw sooner or later. I updated this classic, cabbage-based salad by adding hipster veggies like radicchio and fennel and a splash of vanilla extract. And so Gentrified Coleslaw was born. Recipe will appear in my new cookbook.



Candied Squash Seeds

Here's another one from the new cookbook: Candied Squash Seeds. Most people discard winter squash seeds, but you can toast and/or candy them, just as is the case with pumpkin seeds. They're tiny nutrition powerhouses and make a great topping for salads, soups and even ice cream.



Ravioli in Cashew Cream
After a recent morning of gallery hopping with F-stop, we visited Blossom in Chelsea, NYC.  We split the Ravioli in Cashew Cream. It was extremely decadent and rich, not for the fat-phobic. [Apologies for the photo quality: iPhone camera] 


Seitanic Sandwich
I ordered a seitan sandwich special. It featured slices of seitan scallopini on a delicious, soft ciabatta bread. Good-n-greasy.


Blossom Burrito
F-stop chose the Blossom Burrito, filled with black beans, avocado and vegan cheese. Although my sandwich was great, I liked his better. [Isn't that how it always goes?]

14 comments:

foodfeud said...

Hey Dynise, I'm definitely planning on making the coleslaw soon!
I actually like the photo of the cashew cream ravioli - it looks like a face.
I've never been to Blossom (yet) but I finally made it to Angelica for my first time with my bf the other day and gave in and was lame and just ordered the same thing as him because I knew otherwise I'd be lusting after whatever it was he got! It really does always work like that.

Millie said...

yummy yum yum!

Beth said...

yeah, good luck to you for getting a table at Blossom

Beth said...

What is your definition of gentrification? Please include it in your cookbook.

Erik Marcus said...

That cole slaw looks sensational, Dynise. Can't wait for your new book. Got a release date yet?

Erica said...

i love coleslaw a LOT.

dreaminitvegan said...

My family loves coleslaw. What a great looking ravili dish.

Jenna said...

I love Blossom. Its been ages since I've been there though. Once all this snow decides to stop falling from the sky I'll have to get my butt on the train and eat there again.

vegwhohatestofu said...

All of this looks amazing! Especially the ravioli. Yum :)

dining room table said...

I love coleslaw a lot. It really is something that I want everyday.

Jess - The Domestic Vegan said...

That ravioli looks fantastic! (As does everything else.)

I love coleslaw!

Anonymous said...

Gentrification usually means when neighborhoods consisting of primarily people of color, are slowly (or quickly) taken over by the dominate white culture, until taxes/real estate is too expensive for the original population to stay. Of course you didn't mean this! I know you do not think in this way.

Anonymous said...

Gentrification and urban gentrification are terms refering to the socio-cultural displacement that results when wealthier people acquire property in low income and working class communities.[1] Consequent to gentrification, the average income increases and average family size decreases in the community, which sometimes results in the eviction of lower-income residents because of increased rents, house prices, and property taxes.
Urban gentrification occasionally changes the culturally heterogeneous character of a community to a more economically homogeneous community that some describe as having a suburban character. This process is sometimes made feasible by government-sponsored private real estate investment repairing the local infrastructure, via deferred taxes, mortgages for poor and for first-time house buyers, and financial incentives for the owners of decayed rental housing. Once in place, these economic development actions tend to reduce local property crime, increase property values and prices and increase tax revenues.
Political action, to either promote or oppose the gentrification, is often the community’s response against unintended economic eviction caused by rising rents that make continued residence in their dwellings unfeasible.The rise in property values causes property taxes based on property values to increase; resident owners unable to pay the taxes are forced to sell their dwellings and move to a cheaper community.

Anonymous said...

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